faith in art series

A GOOD MAN IS HARD TO FIND:

ST. JOSEPH IN ART

Saturday, March 27 |

4:00 PM EST / 3:00 PM CST

Dr. Elizabeth Lev

Co-Presented by the Lumen Christi Institute

THE EUCHARIST IN ART:

VISUALIZING MYSTERY


Saturday, April 10 |

4:00 PM EST / 3:00 PM CST

Dr. Elizabeth Lev

Co-Presented by the Lumen Christi Institute

St Joseph was an unassuming latecomer to the history of art, but once discovered, his images evolved rapidly to serve the Catholic Church during challenging times. From model for the papacy, to symbol of marriage and fatherhood, to guide for a good death and advocate for the worker, St Joseph's many guises have made him one of the Church's greatest spiritual treasures. Following Pope Francis' dedication of 2021 to St. Joseph, this talk will look at Giotto, Raphael, Murillo and others as we uncover the many faces of this quiet saint.

The 17th century Catholic Church found itself engaged in a battle over the sacraments, especially the Eucharist. Most Protestant Reformers rejected the teaching of Transubstantiation, while an increasingly empirical culture grew doubtful that a piece of bread and a glass of wine could ever be more than mere matter. To return the gaze of the faithful to mystery, to assist congregations to see beyond the material, the Catholic Church called upon the talent of Caravaggio. the Carracci School and other great artists, who produced works that still delight, teach and move people today. This talk will look at old masterpieces with new eyes, revealing how artists used their gifts to render the invisible, visible.

Dr. Elizabeth Lev is a US art historian based in Rome, with degrees from the University of Chicago and the University of Bologna. In addition to teaching at Duquesne University’s Italian campus, she has been offering tours of the artistic riches of Rome and beyond for over 20 years. Dr. Lev is the author of four books, including  How Catholic Art Saved the Faith: The Triumph of Beauty and Truth in Counter-Reformation Art (2018).

THE VIRGIN MARY IN

THE ART OF LATIN AMERICA 1520 - 1820


Saturday, May 15 |

4:00 PM EST / 3:00 PM CST

Professor Gauvin Alexander Bailey

Co-Presented by the Lumen Christi Institute

Latin Americans in colonial times had an abounding love for the Virgin Mary. During these 300 years, devotions to Mary proliferated widely, particularly among Amerindian groups who identified with her compassion, and her role as an intercessor and mother. The Virgin of Guadalupe is still the most important religious image in Latin America, but many other local devotions sprouted as well, each with distinctive imagery, in large cities and tiny villages, alike from Quito (present-day Ecuador) to Chiloé (Chilean Patagonia). This talk will explore how artists of every background and walk of life transformed imported European images of the Virgin to make her a truly Latin American saint.

Gauvin Alexander Bailey is Professor of Art History and Bader Chair in Southern Baroque Art at Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, where he teaches Renaissance, Baroque, Latin American, and Asian art.  He received his PhD from Harvard and has published numerous articles and nine books including Art of Colonial Latin America (2005);  The Andean Hybrid Baroque: Convergent Cultures in the Churches of Colonial Peru (2010); and Art on the Jesuit Missions in Asia and Latin America, 1542–1773 (1999). He consulted for the US Postal Service on the 2020 Christmas stamp featuring the Virgin of Guápulo. 

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