Non-Credit Courses

Courses in Progress

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Religion & Science Series

How to Forgive?
A Three Session Group Exploration 

Part I: Wednesday November 2, at 4:00PM

          St. Pauls, Harvard Square

          29 Mount Auburn Street, Cambridge, MA

Part II: Wednesday November 16, at 4:00 PM 

            Zoom

Part III: Wednesday November 30, at 4:00 PM 

            Zoom 

Richard Cowden & Kate Jackson-Meyer             

Building on the combined insights from psychology and Catholic moral theology offered in the Forum’s October 19 lecture, this group will explore the issues and challenges posed by forgiveness in greater depth. The Forgiveness Group will meet three times during the month of November (once in person and twice on Zoom) to learn about and discuss an evidence-based approach to forgiveness using the REACH Forgiveness Booklet. The REACH Booklet was developed by Everett L. Worthington and endorsed by the Human Flourishing Program at Harvard to build forgiveness through a self-learning booklet that can be worked through in less than two hours. Participants will work through parts of the REACH Booklet on their own and then meet with the Forgiveness Group periodically in order to reflect on their progress in a supportive group setting that will encourage theological reflection in light of Catholic thought on forgiveness and its importance to the moral life. Materials will be distributed to registered participants. 

This event is made possible through the support of grant #62372 from the John Templeton Foundation, “In Lumine: Promoting the Catholic Intellectual Tradition on Campuses Nationwide”

Fall with the Fathers

Fall Term, Six Fridays, Beginning September 16

12:00-1:15 PM 

St. Paul's, Harvard Square

Christopher McLaughlin, Ph.D., Patristics Scholar 

Open to allIn "Fall with the Fathers," we will study and discuss patristic accounts of redemption and salvation through the writings of some of the most important and profound authors of the early church, such as Irenaeus, Athanasius, and Augustine. This course asks: From what or whom are we saved? How? And to what end?

 

Short texts will be circulated in advance of each class. Lunch will be served at each meeting. 

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neuroscience and the SOul

Fall Term, Second and Fourth Saturdays, 3:45-4:45PM

Begins September 10

St. Paul's, Boles Room, Harvard Square

Sarah Byers, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Philosophy,

Boston College

For current undergraduate or graduate students at Harvard or other area institutionsThis course explores contemporary case studies regarding brain functioning and brain damage, with a special focus on how specifically human traits traditionally attributed to the soul such as personality, abstract thinking, and moral decision-making depend upon or involve the brain. The course analyzes this further by turning to complementary readings from the Catholic intellectual tradition that address the mind or the soul as the seat of some of these activities. In this way, the course integrates both fields through rigorous dialogue. 

 

Readings in-meeting (no preparation required). Participants are invited, but not required, to stay for the 5:00 Mass at St. Paul’s and an optional dinner out in Harvard Square if available.

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This is made possible through the support of grant #62372 from the John Templeton Foundation, “In Lumine: Promoting the Catholic Intellectual Tradition on Campuses Nationwide”

Reading Group: Charles Taylor's 
A SEcular Age

Fall Term, Weekly Wednesdays, 7:00-8:30PM,

Begins September 7

St. Paul's, Harvard Square

Kasey Kimball, Harvard Catholic Forum Graduate Student Fellow

For current undergraduate or graduate students at Harvard or other area institutionsIn this reading group, we will explore Charles Taylor's account of the transition the West has undergone from being a world in which it was virtually impossible not to have religious faith, to one in which religious faith is but one choice among many, and one increasingly difficult to make. We will begin with How (Not) To Be Secular (James K.A. Smith's primer on Taylor) before continuing on to selections of A Secular Age itself.

 

Books will be purchased for all registered participants. A casual dinner will be served at each meeting.

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This is made possible through the support of grant #62372 from the John Templeton Foundation, “In Lumine: Promoting the Catholic Intellectual Tradition on Campuses Nationwide”

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Masterclass: Common Good, Theological and Philosophical Perspectives and Applications

When: Friday, November 11, 2022

            Class: 1:30-5:00 PM EDT

Where: St. Paul’s Campus, Harvard Square  

             29 Mount Auburn Street, Cambridge MA

             

Mary Hirschfeld, 

Notre Dame

This Masterclass will give students the opportunity to gain insights into the theological and philosophical foundations of the Common Good, as well as  practical implications for trying create a just society. This discussion-based event will give students the opportunity to explore the concept of the common good in Catholic Social Thought and beyond; to see and how it bears on economic and philosophical thought; and to ask as how the social sciences and theology can work together to cultivate a flourishing society. Reading materials will be distributed to participants. 

This event is made possible through the support of grant #62372 from the John Templeton Foundation, “In Lumine: Promoting the Catholic Intellectual Tradition on Campuses Nationwide”

Limited to area graduate students.

Registration required 

LANGUAGE WORKSHOPS

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Weekly Wednesdays

Begins September 7, 2022

 

7:00 - 8:00 PM

St. Paul's, Harvard Square

An introductory course in Christian Latin aimed at those who wish to read and understand the Latin Mass, Liturgy of the Hours, and the Vulgate Bible in Latin. We will be using Scanlon's Latin Grammar for the Reading of the Missal and the Breviary as our textbook. A certificate of completion will be provided to students who obtain a passing mark in the optional final exam. Those with little to no prior experience of Latin will benefit most from the course, but participants of all skill levels are more than welcome to enroll. Students will be invited to a closing reception at the end of the semester. The course is taught by Harvard Catholic Forum Graduate Student Fellow, Joost Botman. Books will be purchased for all registered participants.

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1st and 3rd Mondays,

Begins September 19, 2022

 

7:00 - 8:00 PM

Zoom

 

This course will survey inspiring examples of Christian prose and poetry in the original Latin. We will read Jerome's Vulgate, as well as works by Saints Bonaventure, Bernard of Clairvaux, Leo the Great, and Richard of St. Victor. We will also read some hymns. Some language review is included, but the focus is on reading and translation of the texts. Participants should have completed and have some recollection of a year or more of Latin. Classical languages instructor Michael O'Brien and patristics scholar Christopher McLaughlin will teach this group. Texts and learning materials will be distributed or are available online.

Registration

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1st and 3rd Tuesdays,

Begins September 20, 2022

 

7:00 - 8:00 PM

Zoom 

 

This course will read selections from Acts of the Apostles. Some Greek language review is included, but the focus is on reading and translation of the text. Participants should have completed a year of either New Testament or Classical Greek. Teachers are Classical languages instructor Michael O'Brien and Deacon Tim O'Donnell. There is no charge, and texts and learning materials will be distributed or are available online.

Registration